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Cartersville Medical Center

Risk Factors for Fibromyalgia

A risk factor is something that increases your likelihood of getting a disease or condition.

It is possible to develop fibromyalgia with or without the risk factors listed below. However, the more risk factors you have, the greater your likelihood of developing fibromyalgia. If you have a number of risk factors, ask your doctor what you can do to reduce your risk.

There are still many questions regarding the exact cause(s) of fibromyalgia, so risk factors are still being identified. Currently, risk factors include:

Although fibromyalgia may develop in men or women, women are more likely to develop fibromyalgia than men.

People between the ages of 20-60 are at the highest risk of developing the onset of fibromyalgia, although it may occur at any age.

There is some indication that genetic factors may be involved in the development of fibromyalgia. Studies have shown that people with family members who have fibromyalgia are at a higher risk of developing it themselves.

People who have recently experienced a traumatic physical or emotional event, such as a divorce or car accident, may be at a higher risk of developing fibromyalgia.

There is evidence that fibromyalgia and obesity may be linked. Fibromyalgia patients are more likely to be obese.

Many people with fibromyalgia report a history of psychiatric symptoms, but many others do not. There is no clear evidence that psychiatric illness causes fibromyalgia.

You may be at higher risk of fibromyalgia if you have rheumatic diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus or rheumatoid arthritis .

Revision Information

  • About fibromyalgia. National Fibromyalgia Association website. Available at: Accessed August 8, 2013.

  • Fibromyalgia. American College of Rheumatology website. Available at: Updated February 2013. Accessed August 8, 2013.

  • Fibromyalgia. EBSCO DynaMed website. Available at: Updated July 15, 2013. Accessed August 8, 2013.

  • Fibromyalgia. National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases website. Available at: Updated August 2012. Accessed August 8, 2013.

  • Fibromyalgia FAQs. Fibromyalgia Network website. Available at: Accessed August 8, 2013.

  • Ursini F, Naty S, Grembiale RD. Fibromyalgia and obesity: the hidden link. Reumatol Int. 2011;31(11):1403-8.

The health information in this Health Library is provided by a third party. Cartersville Medical Center does not in any way create the content of this information. It is provided solely for informational purposes. It does not constitute medical advice and is not intended to be a substitute for proper medical care provided by a physician. Always consult with your doctor for appropriate examinations, treatment, testing, and care recommendations. Do not rely on information on this site as a tool for self-diagnosis. If you have a medical emergency, call 911.